How to Write a Comparative Analysis Essay

Comparative Analysis Essay

Regardless of your field of studies, you'll have to write a comparative essay at least once. This sort of academic writing seeks to compare the differences or similarities of two scientific concepts, ideas, events etc. If you don't know the peculiarities of comparative analysis or want to find more information about writing comparative essays, check out these tips.

Where to Start?

As any other type of academic essays, a comparative one should start with an introduction. In this opening passage, the reader finds out what the essay will be about, gets familiar with your writing style and finds the thesis sentence. As far as the opening techniques go, you can employ everything ranging from an anecdote to a quote - anything to attract the reader. The main thing that should be presented in your introduction is the mention of two things you're about to compare.

Thesis Statement

As it was mentioned, your introduction should also include the thesis statement. In there you'll have to write what your work will be focused on - similarities, differences or both. You also need to briefly describe the features that you'll be developing further in the text. Remember that you should not present all your arguments in the thesis already, otherwise your reader won't have a point to keep on reading. Instead, you need to kindle some interest that will motivate them to move to the body paragraph.

Body Paragraphs

The number of your body paragraphs will be defined by the number of similarities or differences between the concepts that you compare. Divide the features into logical pairs and dedicate a separate paragraph to each.

Every body paragraph should start with a short topic sentence presenting what exact feature you're going to compare. We should emphasize that this sentence should be short to make the point as clear as possible for the reader. Further on, you can elaborate and use different writing techniques and tricks. To prove your points of view in comparing two concepts, you should apply examples, statistics numbers and checked facts.

Don't forget to use different linking words to give your text a logical flow. Such words as "first of all", "secondly", "nevertheless", "finally", "alternatively" and so on, will guide the reader through the text and help them to follow your train of thought.

Conclusion

The point of the conclusion is not to repeat the things that have already been said, but leave the reader with something to contemplate. Nevertheless, you should once again reflect the differences or similarities of the compared concepts in the conclusion. You're free to add something from yourself or leave the conclusion on this note as long as you're sure that you brought your point across.

Close
 
 

Special Offer!Pay less for your papers

Get 15% off your first order

X