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John Hector

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John Hector St. John was a French-American writer who started writing about life in the American colonies and the surfacing of an American society. In his 1782 works, he tried to define “the American, this new man”. His arguments on this extract were that he was neither a European nor a descendant of the Europeans but was an American who was leaving behind all his primeval prejudices and behaviors, and receiving new ones from the new form of life that he had clinched in America. John de Crevecoeur describes the America’s industry as “unfettered and unrestrained” and his observation that “each person works for himself” (J. Hector St John de Crevecoeur 271). This is a description of capitalism and thus entails an industry that is free from the control and influence of the government. Despite the widespread disagreement on the issue of government having an influence on the industry, most of the Americans argue on the basis that an unrestrained economy and the individual working to enhance themselves as typically American distinctiveness.

St. John de Crevecoeur also illustrates the mixing   of people of various backgrounds that are different to create a new American people: “Here individuals of all nations are melted into a new race of men…” (J. Hector St John de Crevecoeur 313). This is an indispensable description of the American melting pot that over time has become the American symbol of the diverse backgrounds that form a new American identity. St. John de Crevecoeur makes arguments deeply on the friendships and marriages that were formed between persons of different backgrounds and different religions. The interaction of people from various backgrounds was a common aspect in the American society. John’s discussion of these interactions, however, only broadens to the white European connections and nothing in his works makes suggestions that the Native Americans or African Americans are privy to the above interactions.

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